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Top 5 Men's Try Scorers

January 17, 2022 2 min read

All these names will ring a bell for the same reason, but each player scored trys in their own way.

5 Hirotoki Onozawa55 tries in 81 games between 2001–2013 (Japan)

Born in Japan, Hirotoki Onozawa played his rugby for the Sunatory and the Canon Eagles. He was a very explosive player and had pace to burn but wasn't just a fast athlete scoring many tries from great angles and being able to go around defenders rather than going through them with good footwork also.

4 Shane Williams   60 tries in 91 games between 2002–2012 (Wales)

He was small, weighing only 85kg but had speed and footwork that many players would never dream of having. Williams was adored by fans, especially at his home club Ospreys.

3 David Campese   64 tries in 101 games between 1984–1996 (Australia)

Campese was a wizard with the ball in hand and famously scored a memorable try in 1991 against England that won Australia the match. He made try scoring look Campeasy.

2 Bryan Habana   63 tries in 114 games between 2004–2015 (South Africa)

A world cup wing if there ever was one. The Blue Bull, turner Stormer turned Touloner has a truly eletric presence. A sight to be hold, especially when for the Springboks on the Highveld. Habana didn't have the natural ball handling skills of other wingers, but his work rate, speed, power and chip and chase game made him a truly special winger.

1 Daisuke Ohata   69 tries in 58 games between 1996–2006 (Japan)

Daisuke Ohata played his rugby for the Kobelco Steelers and Clermont. He was a truly prolific tryscorer, he holds the record for most tries scored in one World Cup scoring 8 trys in only 5 games at the 2011 world cup. Will Jordan take his throne?



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